ReVision

The Option

  • November 29, -0001
We now know what the President wants in the way of health care reform. He has said plainly, firmly, and, apparently, finally what he will and will not accept in a bill from Congress. At the moment there is only one option on the table for health care reform, that of President Obama. Fair enough. Many questions remain unanswered, many even unposed, but I'm sure these will come out in the days ahead. For now, I have a few of my own.

How are health insurance companies going to be able to conform to all the new requirements without significantly raising the premiums of existing policy-holders? And if they raise those premiums, based on what can only be a best guess about what future costs will be, will they have to continue raising them more than they typically already do? And will that make health insurance in fact less affordable than it is now? If people cannot buy the insurance companies are willing to sell them, will they not begin seeking out the public option? And will that not require the public option to grow in order to accommodate what will be presented as the needs and demands of the American people? Can insurance companies stay in business on that basis? Should we not expect the public option to follow the course of so many other government programs - bloat, corruption, inefficiency, and decline? Will we all become so finally fatigued with the issue that we will willingly place our health care in the hands of public officials, thus ensuring that those officials remain in office who promise to take care of our health needs in perpetuity? If this program is to be paid for by premiums - even, apparently, in the public option - and fees on companies who write big ticket policies, then what are we going to spend the $900 billion on over the next ten years?

This is another instance of government overstepping its bounds, transgressing onto the turf of families, private corporations, and even communities and churches. There is no Biblical mandate for government to ensure the health of its citizens. Christians who support this approach to health care reform will have to look for authority and validation somewhere beyond the pages of Scripture, but then they will be guilty of going beyond what has been written in allocating to government more than what God has decreed and can be expected to bless. Personally, I think we need to stop taking such steps and, instead, begin to rediscover the wisdom of God in His Word, and to insist of our Christ-professing President that he do the same.

T. M. Moore