A Worldview of Hope

Live your Christian worldview, and people will see it.

Foundations for a Christian Worldview: Begin Here (4)

Now by this we know that we know Him, if we keep His commandments. He who says, “I know Him,” and does not keep His commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. But whoever keeps His word, truly the love of God is perfected in him. By this we know that we are in Him. He who says he abides in Him ought himself also to walk just as He walked. 
1 John 2.3-6

Different and desirable
It stands to reason that the subject of Christian worldview would be of interest primarily to Christians. Everyone has a worldview, but most people don’t take the time to think through the various facets and nuances of their worldview. Christians, however, must, since we are called to the Kingdom and glory of God, that we might take every thought captive for obedience to Christ, do all our work as unto Him, make the most of all our time for His glory, and do all things as a witness to Him (1 Thess. 2.12; 2 Cor. 10.3-5; Col. 3.23; Eph. 5.15-17; Acts 1.8).

Thus, we cannot afford to be uninformed or lackadaisical about our Christian worldview. We want to see Jesus filling our world, beginning in our own souls, and flowing out with grace and truth to the people and places of our lives (Eph. 4.8-10; Jn. 7.37-39). This is why, in seeking to understand and develop our Christian worldview, we need to begin at the beginning, with the Law of God and the writings of Moses. For as Jesus said, Moses wrote about Him, and what Moses wrote about Jesus must perforce offer defining insights about Him and the life He has called us to live.

As Christians learn and live their worldview more consistently, an interesting thing happens: People around them start to notice (1 Pet. 3.15). They see things in us that strike them as different, even desirable. They see confidence and an overall positive outlook on life. Our words strike them as being carefully chosen and spoken to illuminate, edify, and encourage. They notice that we tend to be patient with others, and that an aura of peace accompanies our presence. Unlike many other people they know, we’re not prone to become irritable or short with people; nothing about our conversation is merely frivolous or cynical; and overall, we seem to be truly interested in others, and in getting to know them, and always ready to serve and love them. 

What people begin to see and hear in us is hope, the hope of glory (Rom. 5.1, 2), as it works its way into our souls and out in our lives. The Spirit of God is working with the Word of God, beginning in God’s Law (2 Cor. 3.12-18) to form us into the image of the Son of God. And that transformation comes to expression as hope, and in a life of love in all our relationships, roles, and responsibilities.

To know Jesus
This is what it means to know Jesus, to have eternal life (Jn. 17.3). Eternal life is not just about going to heaven when we die. Or living in assurance of heaven here and now. If we truly have eternal life – Christ inus, the hope of glory (Col. 1.27) – then He begins to increase in us, while our old, sinful and self-centered ways fall away (Jn. 3.30; Eph. 4.17-24). As hope grows within us, and Jesus stretches out through us, people will notice, and some will want to know what it is that makes us different.

If this is not the case in your life, then, as the apostle Paul wrote, you may need to “Examine yourself” (2 Cor. 13.5). Are you sure you know Jesus, that you love Jesus, as He is revealed to us in God’s Word? That you are increasing in the knowledge of Jesus, growing in the grace of Jesus, and becoming more like Jesus? The hope of the Christian grows like leaven to enrich every aspect of our lives, but this begins with our setting Jesus apart as Lord in our souls and in every aspect of our lives.

Perhaps Jesus is just Someone you believe in. You believe He lived, died, and rose again. You believe He has forgiven your sins. You believe that you believe in Jesus, and that you’re going to heaven when you die.

But what does believe inmean if it doesn’t lead to hope, expressed as love? And what kind of love can it be for Jesus that does not issue in obedience to His commandments (Jn. 15.10)?

The Christian worldview is about knowing Jesus, and discovering how everything in our lives and the vast cosmos points to Him, draws us to Him, honors and glorifies Him, enables us to participate in Him, and vindicates the work He has done for the salvation of sinners such as you and I. Those who hold a truly Christian worldview want above all else to be transformed increasingly into the image of Jesus Christ, and then to experience Jesus welling up within, overflowing from, and filling all the roles, relationships, and responsibilities of their lives.

As they see this happening, they can know that they truly know Jesus, and, knowing Jesus, they will emit the fragrance of Him in love and hope into every nook and cranny of their lives.

And so, begin here
If we truly love this Jesus, if we really do know Him, we will keep His commandments. Jesus kept all the commandments of God, and, by so doing, He fulfilled all the righteousness we require to be acceptable to God and to dwell with Him. Jesus’ righteousness alone is sufficient to give us entry to the divine presence and adoption into His eternal family. We do not keep the Law to become righteous.

Nevertheless, as Paul says (Rom. 3.31), the Law of God is firmly established for those who believe, for it is holy and righteous and good, it exposes our sin and illuminates the path Jesus walked, and it reveals Jesus to us for our contemplation and transformation (Rom. 7.12; Rom. 7.7; 2 Cor. 3.12-18).

All the more reason for beginning our study of the Christian worldview in the Law of God.

If you love Jesus, you will delight to see Him as He is revealed in God’s Law. And when you’ve seen and contemplated Him there, you will be filled with hope, and ready to live out what you’re learning of Him in joyful obedience. This is Christian worldview, seeing your world according to its need for Jesus, and being a vessel of hope to bring the reality of Jesus into all your relationships, roles, and responsibilities. 

Live this way and you’ll know hope. And your hope will show. And gradually, you’ll begin to discover that you aren’t the only person interested in Christian worldview.

For reflection
1. How important is it that you be ready to “give an answer” to anyone who asks a reason for the hope that is in you? What would your answer be?

2. What is it about the Law of God that produces a life of hope in those who walk in it?

3. Why should we expect the Law of God to offer “defining insights” into Jesus and the life to which He calls us? 

Next steps – Transformation: What opportunities will you have today to show Jesus to the people you meet? How can you prepare for those opportunities right now?

The Christian worldview focuses on Jesus. Do you know Him? Our book, 
To Know Him, can help you answer that question confidently, and equip you to tell others about Jesus as well. Order your copy by clicking here.

At The Ailbe Seminary, all our courses are designed to help you grow in your Christian worldview. Watch this brief video (click here) to get an overview of our curriculum, and to see again the place of Jesus in the Christian worldview.


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Except as indicated, Scripture taken from the New King James Version. © Copyright 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission.

T.M. Moore

T. M. Moore is principal of The Fellowship of Ailbe, a spiritual fellowship in the Celtic Christian tradition. He and his wife, Susie, make their home in Essex Junction, VT. 

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