Everyone to Whom Much Was Given, of Him Much Will be Required

Jesus is talking about US.

Luke 12:41-48 (ESV)

Peter said, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for all?” And the Lord said, “Who then is the faithful and wise manager, whom his master will set over his household, to give them their portion of food at the proper time? Blessed is that servant whom his master will find so doing when he comes. Truly, I say to you, he will set him over all his possessions. But if that servant says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and begins to beat the male and female servants, and to eat and drink and get drunk, the master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he does not know, and will cut him in pieces and put him with the unfaithful. And that servant who knew his master's will but did not get ready or act according to his will, will receive a severe beating. But the one who did not know, and did what deserved a beating, will receive a light beating. Everyone to whom much was given, of him much will be required, and from him to whom they entrusted much, they will demand the more.

Peter starts off by asking, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for all?” It seems that Jesus doesn’t answer him. Or does He?

Let’s begin with some things we know. First, Peter’s question is referring to the preceding parable about being ready. This amounts to asking if everyone is supposed to be ever-ready or just the disciples. Second, we know that the correct answer to Peter’s question is that this parable is for everyone, because it made it into the Bible, and here we are, thousands of years later, studying it.

And notice how Jesus responds. He just stays on His original point. He tells another parable that extends the lesson to say that the one who stays ready is faithful and wise. He also wraps it up with, “Everyone to whom much was given, of him much will be required, and from him to whom they entrusted much, they will demand the more.

Peter’s question is silly and arrogant. Why wouldn’t this parable be for all? Does he really think the disciples are that special? Very few of Jesus’ lessons were just for His disciples, and those few tended to be tough, negative things about their immediate future.

Of course these lessons are general. Jesus makes this clear by just going on with the lesson.

Poor Peter. He makes a lot of verbal fumbles. Funny how Jesus uses them.


It sounds like Jesus was talking about us when He said, “Everyone to whom much was given, of him much will be required, and from him to whom they entrusted much, they will demand the more.

Everyone who lives in modern America has been given much, and so much will be required. Take this as a challenge. Jesus didn’t give us these blessings so we could party. He means us to use them.

Consider how you can apply your own special blessings to His service. Take stock of what you’ve been given, especially anything unique or unexpected. This includes talents, tools, and other resources. It can even include things that definitely don’t look like blessings. Big trials are big training.

These are gifts – meant for you to use. God is preparing you for His work.


The weekly study guides, which include discussion questions, are available for download here:

https://www.ailbe.org/resources/itemlist/category/91-deep-studies


Mike Slay

As a mathematician, inventor, and ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church in America, Mike Slay brings an analytical, conversational, and even whimsical approach to the daily study of God's Word.

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